Spring and Grails apps on the Cloud

Some very interesting news from SpringSource this morning. They just continue to fire on all cylinders.

SpringSource has acquired Cloud Foundry, which enables you to set up the hosting environment for your Spring Framework and Groovy on Grails applications in minutes.

Cloud Foundry is built from the ground up to be the fastest way to deploy and manage Spring, Grails, and Java web applications in the cloud. Deployment using Cloud Foundry is a quick two-step process with the web application that you have created using the development tool of your choice:

  1. Upload your Spring, Grails, or Java web application to Cloud Foundry
  2. Select your deployment blueprint (topology, instance type, clustering, auto-scaling configuration, etc.) and launch it in Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)

That’s it. Your application is now live and serving requests without fumbling with Amazon Web Services (AWS) APIs, bare-metal virtual machines, software installation and configuration, file transfers, and other tedious tasks.

So, instead of securing a hosting environment (whether through a third party service or in your own data center) you can provision space on the Cloud to eliminate the system, network, and middleware setup and maintenance steps.

In effect, it’s AOP writ large, abstracting away the cross-cutting middleware dependencies of your application into a separate component so you can instead focus on your business problem rather than many non-functional requirements.

In this way, I see this finally bridging the gap for small to medium sized applications that traditionally would rely on shared hosting for LAMP applications.

That is, as a freelancer or small agency you’ve now removed a major roadblock to deploying a small site on Spring or Grails rather than PHP and MySQL.

As of today, the Cloud Foundry instances for Spring support Apache 2.2, SpringSource tc Server (Tomcat 6) or Tomcat 5.5, and MySQL 5.0.

Though since this is all provisioned via Amazon’s EC2 service that supports DB2, I wonder how easy it would be to bring that data server into an application instance…

Very interesting indeed.

How to pronounce New Haven

09 August 2009 » Opinion, Peeves, Travel

A recent trip on Metro-North reminds me that I need to submit this script snippet to Seth MacFarlane.

Brian: Wait, what did you say?
Stewie: NEW Haven.
Brian: NEW Haven? You mean New Haven.
Stewie: NEW Haven.
Brian: You’re saying it weird. Why are you putting so much emphasis on the New?
Stewie: NEW Haven.
Brian: Say New York.
Stewie: New York.
Brian: Say New England.
Stewie: New England.
Brian: Say New Haven.
Stewie: NEW Haven.
Brian: You’re eating hair!

Sigh. If it’s still not clear, ask your local Connecticutioner / Connecticutlet before you embarrass yourself on the train.