WebSphere sMash at New York PHP April 28th

Next Tuesday night we’re excited to have WebSphere guru Roland Barcia introduce the latest PHP and Web 2.0 capabilities in IBM’s WebSphere sMash environment (built on Project Zero) to the New York PHP community:

IBM WebSphere sMash is a platform for developing and running agile Web applications using scripting languages and Web 2.0 technologies such as RESTful Web services, JavaScript Object Notation, and Atom and RSS feeds.

It supports the Groovy language, familiar to Java programmers, and PHP for access to thousands of PHP applications and libraries,and the huge PHP developer community.

IBM WebSphere sMash is focused on significant improvement in time-to-value for Situational Applications and Mashups.

Partners and community have found that by combining PHP applications and libraries with new code written in PHP or Groovy for the IBM WebSphere sMash platform, they can achieve significant reduction in development time for Situational Applications and Mashups.

We cover an overview of the PHP support in IBM WebSphere sMash and the support for generating new PHP code before exploring more detailed scenarios demonstrating PHP applications being extended, integrated and mashed up.

The presentation comes on the heels of the latest WebSphere sMash v1.1.0.1 release that includes PHP performance improvements and the new PHP to Groovy bridge (call Groovy classes from PHP).

Here’s a little background on how sMash relates to Project Zero (you can find more info on the about page):

  • Project Zero experimental builds (latest are named LeMans and Sebring). Includes the latest/greatest functional enhancements, tools, and bug fixes that haven’t yet made it into the generally available product. No-charge for development and limited deployments. Support via the Project Zero community.
  • WebSphere sMash Developer Edition – includes tooling as well as the stable, production-ready runtime. No-charge for development and limited deployments. Support via the Project Zero community.
  • WebSphere sMash – same stable, production-ready runtime as WebSphere sMash Developer Edition, but warranted & licensed for full production deployments. Available for purchase from IBM. Support available via the Project Zero community and 24x7x365 voice & electronic IBM support included with each new license purchase.

On a personal level, I’m excited to learn more about the PHP capabilities at this meeting first hand. I had a chance to work with sMash recently on an internal situational application. It used Groovy however, not PHP.

There’s also a slew of articles on developerWorks to learn about writing apps for sMash. In particular, Introducing IBM WebSphere sMash, Part 1: Build RESTful services for your Web application is a good place to start.

Back to the NYPHP meeting, please make sure you RSVP at least 24 hours in advance, by 6pm ET on Monday, April 27th for the meeting Tuesday night.

Hope to see you there!

CommunityOne East roundup

The network is the computer… finally? It seems that Sun’s motto comes full circle, and perhaps confirms their business plan all along.

I attended Sun’s CommunityOne East in Manhattan last Wednesday and cloud was the word of the day. It was also an apt term to describe IBM’s vague overture towards the hardware/software stalwart that morning.

I didn’t walk away from the conference with specifics about the new buzzword, but I do appreciate that it captures some of what IBM has been doing, and therefore reveals a rare bit of consensus among the major vendors:

Other notes from the sessions I attended:

  • OpenESB: Connecting Enterprises: Sang Shin is an excellent instructor and firmly placed three technologies I’m evaluating for some current business needs… BPEL, WSDL, and SOAPui. Despite the compelling demo of NetBeans, I missed the actual server side / asynchronous implementation that is the promise of the ESB.
  • GlassFish v3, OSGi, Java EE 6 Preview and Tools (Eclipse, NetBeans): JEE 6 was introduced in the context of GlassFish 3. There still seems to be some work to get the standards settled any time soon for implementation in WebSphere 8. I look forward to the annotation-based and modular approach of the new standard.
  • Dynamic Languages: The Next Big Thing for the JVM or an Evolutionary Dead End? Chris Richardson reaffirmed some of my observations about Groovy… while cool, it may be the overly rebellious offspring of a middle-aged Java; Brilliant in flashes, but not quite predictable enough to bank on. Scala, however, seems to have lots of promise.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t attend Hans’ presentation on MySQL and PHP – State of the Union, but it appears to have been well received. In fact, you might expect a reprise at NYPHP’s June 23rd meeting.

DB2 on the Mac arrives

19 December 2008 » DB2, IBM, Mac, PHP

Antonio Cangiano just posted that DB2 Express-C for 64-bit Intel Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) is now available for download from IBM.

Stay tuned to his site for more details.

Listing DB2 triggers, routines, indexes and keys

10 December 2008 » DB2, IBM

I recently compared two DB2 databases that should have been identical, but for some reason were not. The foreign keys were missing from one of the instances.

I suspect the keys were lost during a migration when the administrator commented out the constraints in the DDL as a means to avoid errors on import. Unfortunately, the admin never ran the ALTER statements to add them even after all tables were present.

To be sure nothing else was different, I checked for the existence of other database objects to make sure they were not lost as well. DB2 offers a simple way to query for these objects via the SYSIBM and SYSCAT schemas:

Viewing triggers

SELECT NAME
FROM SYSIBM.SYSTRIGGERS
WHERE SCHEMA = ‘[SCHEMA]’
ORDER BY NAME

Viewing stored procedures and UDFs: P = Procedure, F = Function

SELECT ROUTINENAME, ROUTINETYPE
FROM SYSIBM.SYSROUTINES
WHERE ROUTINESCHEMA = ‘[SCHEMA]’
ORDER BY ROUTINENAME

Viewing indexes

SELECT NAME, CREATOR, USER_DEFINED
FROM SYSIBM.SYSINDEXES
WHERE CREATOR = ‘[SCHEMA]’
ORDER BY NAME

Viewing foreign keys (by database)

SELECT
SUBSTR(TABNAME, 1, 30) TABLE_NAME,
SUBSTR(CONSTNAME, 1, 20) FK_NAME,
SUBSTR(REFTABNAME, 1, 12) PARENT_TABLE,
SUBSTR(REFKEYNAME, 1, 20) PK_ORIG_TABLE,
FK_COLNAMES
FROM SYSCAT.REFERENCES
ORDER BY TABLE_NAME

Viewing foreign keys (by table)

SELECT
SUBSTR(TABNAME, 1, 30) TABLE_NAME,
SUBSTR(CONSTNAME, 1, 20) FK_NAME,
SUBSTR(REFTABNAME, 1, 12) PARENT_TABLE,
SUBSTR(REFKEYNAME, 1, 20) PK_ORIG_TABLE,
FK_COLNAMES
FROM SYSCAT.REFERENCES
WHERE TABNAME = ‘[TABLE]’

To make sure I don’t have consistency problems in the future, my next step is to put together a short script to automate these queries post install.

IDUG India highlights

30 August 2008 » DB2, IBM, WebSphere

I just returned from two weeks in Bengaluru (Bangalore). The trip was quite productive, as I was able to work with my team on a complex Eclipse RCP/Apache Derby application in person, and solidify the two most important pillars of an extended team development effort; communication and collaboration.

Since I worked US Eastern time while in India – late afternoon to late evening weekdays – I also had a chance to attend the IDUG 2008 India Forum in the early part of the day Friday and all day Saturday.

Much like the on site face time with my development team, this conference provided an excellent opportunity to interact with DB2 experts and to put all the new Information Management technologies and products into a meaningful context.

Of particular relevance to my day job, the forum clarified where DB2 fits into the larger WebSphere, Web 2.0, and SOA picture. I was able to pick up some clever ideas for the IBM Press Room migration to DB2 9.5 next spring.

A few highlights and lessons learned from the conference:

  • Attending Curt Cotner’s keynote on the new IBM Data Studio tool and pureQuery technology. This Eclipse-based tool has a lot of potential as a standalone application development platform, or plug-in to my existing Rational Software Architect setup. Using pureQuery to improve performance and ease root cause analysis for WebSphere and DB2 apps was impressive. I also had a chance to meet Curt and chat with him briefly about PHP Web application frameworks and drivers.
  • Hearing from Leon Katsnelson about how DB2 fits into the larger SOA picture, with two very innovative case studies. One example in particular about managing volatile data in DB2 – such as currency rates and weather conditions – using a Java stored procedure to make a Web services call was very enlightening.
  • Finally getting my head around REST. The past weeks have featured a storm of misunderstanding about SOAP and RESTful Web services, sparked by a comment made by Damien Katz. Following the conversations there helped me understand the pros and cons of each philosophy, and attending a few sessions at the conference helped solidify the fundamental differences in approach to SOA.
  • Reminding myself to look into the Web 2.0 Starter Toolkit for IBM DB2. There seems to be some really cool sample applications and monitoring tools in there.
  • Getting a primer on Ruby as a language and seeing a live demo of Ruby on Rails as a framework. I’m not planning to jump ship anytime soon, but there are tons of ideas in there that can be fed back into the architectures I develop in my day job.
  • Thanks to Matthias Nicola, who was kind enough to copy his XQuery & SQL/XML cheatsheet onto a pen drive for me, I was able to play around with pureXML on my local copy of DB2.
  • Finally figuring out the difference between Data Studio and Data Studio Developer. The former is the free tool, the latter is the kit that can be licensed from IBM for a fee and includes all the cool pureQuery stuff.
  • Taking advantage of the opportunity for a free shot at the DB2 9 Application Developer exam (I passed!) and shoring up my cursor usage and trace analysis skills through some pre-test cramming.

So, all in all a great business trip and excellent conference. Kudos to the conference organizers, IDUG, and the presenters.

Trip to Bengaluru

16 July 2008 » DB2, Photos, Travel

I just confirmed my trip to southern India. I’ll be in Bengaluru (Bangalore) for about 2 weeks. It’s my first trip to Asia, so I’m really looking forward to it.

The preparations for this trip have been more complex than any other overseas trip I’ve taken. The good new is that once the visa paperwork and vaccinations are complete, the barriers to travel to the region will be much lower in the future.

My trip will finish up the second week of August, which coincides with India’s Independence Day. Apparently there’s a semi-annual botanical show at Lal Bagh that day and for some reason my camera is really good at taking pictures of flowers. :), so there’s always that.

But I’d love to know what else is recommended to do that Friday the 15th, or on the weekends in general. Side trips to Ooty and Kodaikanal have been recommended. Other hints, tips?

Update: Due to the Lufthansa strike, I pushed my trip back one week, and will now be able to attend the IDUG India Forum (Friday morning and all day Saturday) which is taking place right next to my hotel. That looks to be a great opportunity to hear from Curt Cotner and several other DB2 experts. Good stuff.

Up and Running with DB2 on Linux

16 July 2008 » DB2, IBM, PHP, Writing

The second edition of “Up and Running with DB2 on Linux” was published in June. This IBM Redbook gives readers the latest information they need to exploit DB2 9.5 for Linux.

I performed a technical review of this book, recommending updates here and there to the introductory section and the chapter on using the new Eclipse-based IBM Data Studio tool. I also provided the short section on using DB2 with PHP in chapter 8.

The editor took my suggestion to include a link to planetdb2.com in the online resources list, to give readers a way to keep on top of day-to-day news about DB2 from the experts who blog about it.

The entire review process was a great way to learn about the latest developments in the DB2 for Linux world. I hope the book provides you with the same insight.

Have a look and submit your feedback to help improve the next edition.

Begun, the data server proxy wars have

25 March 2008 » DB2, IBM, MySQL, New York PHP, PHP, PostgreSQL
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