Log Buffer #78: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

04 January 2008 » DB2, IBM, MySQL, PHP, System administration, XML

Happy new year everyone! This week I’m honored to host the 78th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly roundup of database blogs.

A special thanks goes to Dave Edwards of the Pythian Group for the opportunity to start the year right by catching up on the latest developments around the database world. I’ve been blissfully out of the loop planning a wedding, relaxing on the honeymoon, and spending time with family. :)

About this week’s news
Many folks were also off celebrating the holidays (or recovering from New Year’s celebrations), so it’s been a quiet week.

Without an earth-shattering announcement to stir up controversy, there’s been a trend towards end-of-year summaries, predictions for the new year, and time to jot down tips or otherwise reflect on projects that scratch the author’s itch.

I’m an IBM Web application developer – not a database administrator per se – so this week’s edition will offer my biased take on the news. I hope you enjoy anyway. :)

DB2 and Informix
First up, Chris Eaton encourages us to have a look at (and get involved with) the new PHP-based DB2 Monitoring Console project at SourceForge.

The DB2MC aims be the long awaited Web-based console for managing DB2 instances and databases, merging the role of the standalone Control Center shipped with DB2 and the simplified approach to database administration taken by the popular phpMyAdmin project favored by many MySQL shops.

Over at DB2 Magazine, Scott Hayes of DBI asserts that “performing excessive and unnecessary sorts is the number two performance killer in most databases” on the Linux, Unix, and Windows platform. Fortunately, he offers a few tips for neutralizing this elusive killer.

On the mainframe, Robert Catterall provides some tips for maximizing performance when accessing data by tweaking the size of blocks fetched over the network from DB2 z/OS.

Further good news for DB2 customers is that the always popular “Recommended reading lists” for database administration and application development at IBM developerWorks have been updated for v9.

On the Informix platform, the latest issue of the International Informix Users Group (IIUG) Insider has been published, which announces that registration for the IIUG Informix conference is open, announces board elections (man, those middle American states have a lot of electoral clout) and reflects on the year marked by the release of IDS 11 at mid-year.

MySQL
Over at The Open Road, CNET blogger Matt Asay reveals MySQL CEO MÃ¥rten Mickos’ reflections on 2007. The widespread adoption of several editions of MySQL 5 was a highlight this year, along with advancements in scale-out features such as replication, partitioning, load-balancing, and caching.

Mickos notes that MySQL continues to build on its strength as a Web database and expand into corporations to complement instead of compete with existing proprietary platforms such as Oracle.

In other integration news, there has been some traction on the planned DB2 storage engine and MySQL port to i5/OS. An IBM Redbook will be published by the end of the month.

Moving down to the bare metal, Mark Robson has decided to put down an explanation for the many users who ask him about the pitfalls of running out of address space (not memory itself) on 32-bit MySQL installations.

Short answer: Spring for a 64-bit machine and stock plenty of RAM, regardless of the underlying operating system. :)

PostgreSQL
Andrew Dunstan offers up source for a conditional update trigger that intercepts modifications if their values don’t differ from what’s already in the database. This filter can save the expense incurred by unnecessary index updates.

Leo Hsu and Regina Obe clarify PostgreSQL’s support for stored procedures (or lack thereof) for a user over at the Postgres OnLine Journal.

They retort; “So the question is, is there any reason for PostgreSQL to support bona fide stored procedures aside from the obvious To be more compatible with other databases and not have to answer the philosophical question, But you really don’t support stored procedures?” Touché, grasshopper.

Robby Russell points us to the call for papers at PGCon 2008, and is himself interested in seeing a presentation relevant to Ruby on Rails Web app developers.

Oracle
Howard Rogers provides a hefty PDF of the courseware he once used to teach a 5 day bootcamp – complete with exercises, slides and explanatory notes on “everything there is to know about Oracle.” But does not that mean the oracle also knows everything about Howard? Think about it.

The seventy megabyte download targets 9i and has been partially updated for 10g, but the underlying themes should still be relevant for 11g.

Richard Foote provides details another subtle gotcha in his series on the difference between unique and non-unique indexes.

A befuddled Steven Karam details his root cause analysis of a problem upgrading Oracle 10 across x86 platforms. He found the solution despite a none-too-helpful error message. He concludes with a suggestion to Oracle for a better way to aid those who run into a similar problem…

Matt Topper announced a new way to keep up with Oracle news, a link-sharing site called Ora-Click.com. For those groaning “not another social network for geeks,” this is a subject specific site and looks quite slick. I can see this model being emulated by other technology or product knowledge domains.

Eddie Awad is already on board with the Ora-Click idea and has offered a few suggestions for making it even more useful.

SQL Server
There have been quite a few posts about learning the new features of SQL Server 2008 ahead of its hotly anticipated February release.

SSQA.net provides us with a pointer to virtual training courses that Microsoft is offering through the end of January ahead of the 2008 general release. This ten part Web seminar series covers topics ranging from high availability to manageability, security, business intelligence, and reporting.

Bob Beauchemin has a trio of tips for using the new features of SQL Server 2008. There are some tips on plan guidance, as well as a pointer on using row constructors.

Thrudb
With all the buzz surrounding SimpleDB in December, Ilya Grigorik, CTO of Igvita details Jake Luciani‘s “faster, cheaper alternative” to Amazon’s offering. So far the reviews are positive. If you’re into document-based databases or S3 storage, this is worth a look.

CouchDB
Anant Jhingran and Sam Ruby have announced that Damien Katz of CouchDB will join IBM over in Information Management. In addition, CouchDB will be donated to the Apache Software Foundation as a top level project.

ObjectStore
Dan Weinreb, co-founder of Object Design which developed ObjectStore, carries on the backlash against Michael Stonebraker with a detailed account of how object-oriented database technology did indeed succeed from both a business and technical perspective.

In a follow-on post the same day, Weinreb delves into more detail about the lessons learned when creating ObjectStore.

In the words of the great General Kenobi, “Luke, you will find that many of the truths we cling to depend greatly on our own point of view.”

 

And that wraps it up for this week’s Log Buffer. I hope you have a good time reading, but make sure you don’t spend all weekend in front of the computer, there’s plenty of good old analog wild card action to follow. Go Giants!

Have a great 2008!

  

2 Responses to 'Log Buffer #78: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs'

Subscribe to comments with RSS

  1. Adam said,

    09 January 2008 at 8:29 am

    Now this is a long post, but an informative one! Thanks a lot.

  2. Daniel Krook said,

    09 January 2008 at 8:50 am

    Thanks Adam,

    I figured I wouldn’t have much to write with the short news week, but I guess I was wrong :)

Leave a Reply